Spotlight Author Blog Tour for Peggy Hattendorf

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Developing Good Dialogue

Developing good dialogue should be easy since it’s basically a conversation with two or more people. We talk and converse with people everyday.  However, we’ve all experienced times in discourse when we take pause – not really sure what to say or how to say it.

For the writer this is magnified as crisp and precise sentences must be developed not just for one but for a host of characters. Then the wording must appear authentic and thread seamlessly in communications between and among characters.

Dialogue is paramount and can make or break a story. Every word must be pondered, every word the proper fit and every descriptive term or adverb cautiously applied.

It’s the essential ingredient that progresses the movement and adds the dramatic touch and overtones to the narration.

Good dialogue commands the writer have an awareness and understanding of the differences in the way people speak and the length of their sentences. Consideration must be given to the use of inflections, slang terms, swear words and colloquialisms. An understanding of socio-economic status and circumstances, geographic locations, accents and regional dialects are also fundamentals in developing appropriate dialogue.

The process of writing dialogue must be viewed from several perspectives. There’s dialogue that requires us to get into the minds of our characters to understand their feelings, thoughts and motivations. Then there’s the scenes where we deliberately keep the character in the dark and don’t permit him/her to act or speak as if he/she has the knowledge of what’s about to happen.

Dialogue must be credible and believable. Dialogue must be meaningful, appropriate and at times dramatic. Dialogue must have rising conflict. Dialogue must be properly placed to interrupt and transition narration.

Dialogue that delivers on all these points will make the book vibrant and come alive in the mind of the reader.

I welcome your comments or questions and am reachable at:

Peggy@peggyhattendorf.com

Author – Son of My Father – A Family Dynasty Travel Editor – hers Magazine

Son of My Father

Author Bio:

Peggy’s earlier careers helped cultivate and enrich her interest in writing. In her executive positions in the non-profit field, she had the opportunity to compose technical and operational handbooks for staff and volunteers for a number of name recognized organizations. Her management experience guided her to a multi-decade second career in the travel industry highlighted with the co-founding of a nationwide marketing consortium and independent contractor network. With over 5000 members, generating $180 million in annual sales, she wrote daily travel updates and news briefs distributed electronically to the membership.  Today, she maintains an ambitious travel schedule and is the Travel Editor for hers Magazine where she writes travel feature articles and Hotel Review blog posts. In addition, she still serves on a number on non-profit boards.  Her background with upscale and luxury travel products served as cornerstones in the character development and storyline of her first novel – “Son of My Father – A Family Dynasty.” She is currently working on her second book.

 

 

Author Contact:
Twitter: @peggyhattendorf
Facebook: www.facebook.com/peggy.hattendorf
Website: www.peggyhattendorf.com

 

My Most Important Writing Lesson

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Back in the monkey days, when Fs were real and our local university was still respected as a school, I took what may have been called English 101, a writing class with a widely dreaded three hour written composition for a final. Since I had long been praised for my writing, I was looking forward to it.

A Mr. Parks walked in with his greasy blond hair, crooked horn rimmed glasses, sandals and miss-matched socks, and announced that they couldn’t find a PhD., so he was teaching for the quarter.

A wave of groans passed through the class.

“Too bad,” he said. “See this book? Turn to page thirty-six.” We read a short story to ourselves and then discussed it as he paced about, white froth gathering at the corners of his mouth.

The next day we had an essay to write before we left.images

On the following day, he handed out a fistful of F papers and two Ds. There were no higher grades. I had one of the D papers. The kids from ‘way up in Chicago howled with indignation. Their daddies would see that he was fired.

“I got a D,” I said.

“Too bad.”

“But I don’t ever get grades like that…”

“Time you did,” he said.

“But most of my paper’s marked out with red ink…”

Ivy“That’s because it stinks,” he said. “Look. If you want to fix it, come to my office before the day’s over.”

I showed up and stood in line with the rest of the class.

When I stepped into his office, he had his feet on his desk, watching me have a seat.

“So what’s wrong with it?” I said as I read aloud a few lines.

“I already told you. It stinks.”

“But doesn’t this sound…?”

“Do you think anyone gives a shit about your choice of words or your specially chosen 2730510797_1a5b5af433_zphrases?” he said, tossing the paper back at me. “Look. The first paragraph. What are you trying to say?”

I started to read the first line.

“No! Just look at me and tell me about what’s in the first paragraph.”

“Well…” I said, “Nancy was in a state of bliss because she was naive?”

“Good!” he said. “That’s exactly what you should have written. “Now I’ve got Miss What’s Her Face standing in the doorway all anxious, with a slew of people behind her.”

TomI ended up with an A for the quarter, and came away knowing that it’s not the words you like which makes your writing good, but the words you have no problem throwing away.

 

Tom Phipps

Author Publicity Pack: Resources to Take Your Book Marketing to the Next Level

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If you have little or no finances to pay for marketing to promote your book, then look no further; this book is for you! In the Author Publicity Pack by Shelly Hitz and Heather Hart you will find a multitude of places to promote and advertise your book and most of them are absolutely free! Plus you will find many valuable links in the book for places to get free press releases, book awards, reviews, virtual book shelves and author forums and more.

I personally checked out most of the links in the book and found them to be current and useful. The one and only link which gave me trouble was one for a place called ‘Human Made’ and the problem wasn’t actually with the link but with an available download on the site to upgrade my flash player, which warning triangles were advising me was out of date for the site. Take my word for it, you do not want to download that flash player because some malicious add-ware has attached itself to the download. I had a very bad time getting my computer cleaned up and running correctly after that. However, as long as you don’t try to update your flash player on that site, everything else is fine.

Author Publicity Pack is a well-written, easy to follow and use guide that every author can use and benefit from and should definitely have in their personal Book Promo Toolbox. What an incredible value for a mere $0.99.

By: Carol Marrs Phipps