Writing Process Blog Tour

kayeKaye Vincent, a lovely and very talented author from the UK kindly invited Tom and me to participate in this Writing Process Blog Tour. Kaye writes romance/suspense and romance/paranormal novels. Her wonderful tales, though highly enchanting, with just enough of the otherworldly to satisfy those who like to stretch the edges of reality, remain completely believable and realistic. Her books are richly interwoven stories that bring not only the characters to life, but also the community in which they live and interact. I adored both her books in the Hanningdon Magic Series and eagerly await her next offering. Copy of advert-image-both-books, Kaye Now a bit about Tom and me:

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What are we working on?

Tom and I began publishing books in our epic fantasy series, Heart of the Staff in 2012. To date we have written five books in this series, Good Sister, Bad Sister, The Collector Witch, Stone Heart, The Burgeoning and the Reaper Witch along with a prequel that takes place one thousand years before the events in the first book of the series. cropped-Possible-New-Header-1_edited-4.jpg     Currently we are writing Doom, the 6th and final book in the Heart of the Staff series. We plan to release it later this year.

How does our work differ from others of its genre?

We are careful to thoroughly develop the characters of our antagonists as as well as that of our protagonists. We are altogether convinced that engaging stories need realistic characters and settings. So in order to develop plenty of literary tension, even our imaginary phenomena such as magic must follow the natural laws within the story and be palpably real.

Why do we write what I do?

When I was a little girl, I was captivated by magical tales. I wanted to be sprinkled with pixie dust so I could fly away with Peter Pan. I wanted to travel the yellow brick road in the witch’s slippers with Dorothy and the faint hearted lion. And I certainly wanted to be awakened by the kiss of a handsome prince. Small wonder that my passion today is writing Fantasy. There is nothing I enjoy more than going to my computer to escape with Tom and my readers to a magical world so very real that it can be touched. While my delight is bringing to life the tales of those who must find their way through the perils of our realms, Tom brings the natural world with him into our stories.

How does our writing process work?

We go for long walks or for long rides on our tandem, working out ideas. Our computers sit side by side, so we trade chapter manuscripts back and forth until we are both pleased.

Now meet some exceptional authors who will carry on the Writing Process Blog Tour:

March 30 2014 032Author, Susan Waterwyk, masterfully crafted a magical and at times whimsical world, to enchant, captivate and fill your senses with a place alluringly different, peopled with characters and creatures so fascinating that you can’t help falling in love…with Lantamyra. and A Tale of Two Worlds. She is currently hard at work creating the final book in this highly imaginative and completely captivating trilogy. Susan is not only a master storyteller, she also paints and writes poetry, as well. You can read samples of her lovely poetry in her books and enjoy her artistry on the covers of both Lantamyra and A Tale of Two Worlds.   A Tale of Two Worlds, Amazon Imae Large Lantamyra cover             The outstanding writing team of Jack Everett, David Coles and Adele Abbot from the UK are incredibly talented authors who write in a variety of genres. But one thing you can count on, their excellent and highly imaginative tales will keep you enthralled regardless of the genre.                                                 Jack 63a david                                                                       adele   Jack and David are currently editing a crime triology they will be publishing in the near future through Barking Rain Press, while Adele is busily writing the sequel to her fantasy novel, Postponing Armageddon. A few of their most recent books: Postponing Armageddon(f&sf)   The Diamond Seekers(thriller)   Of Machines and Magics(f&sf)   The Back of Beyond(historic) 510x765-Armageddon-250x375review cover We hope you all enjoy the blog tour and discover a new writer or two who’s books you’ll love to read.

 

 

 

 

Carol Marrs Phipps & Tom Phipps

Interview of UK Fantasy Author of Postponing Armageddon, Adele Abbot

adeleWhat is your name, where were you born and where do you live now?

 

Adele Abbot (one T), I was born in York, UK & I live between Leeds and Bradford, UK

Please tell us a little about yourself (something different not contained in your bio).

I’m the daughter of an Indie writer and honorary niece to another

How long have you been writing?

Since 2006

What do you believe is the most difficult thing about becoming an author?

Finding readers! That’s a little mischievous, obviously, putting one word after another to make an interesting and coherent read is probably the most difficult – especially when you have a 4 year old needing your attention. But once you’ve served your apprenticeship, and I think I have, getting your name out there is difficult and frustrating, I do have a few novels that have fallen by the wayside.

What do you like to do when you are not writing?

Getting out and about, what my son calls ‘Mummy & Daddy’ days.

What is the name of your latest book, and if you had to summarize it in less than 20 510x765-Armageddon-250x375words what would you say?

It’s called Postponing Armageddon. A historical fantasy, dogmatic religion versus creatures we think of as myth and legend about to be made extinct.

Was there any particular thing that inspired you to write Postponing Armageddon?

It was written after I was made redundant as we say here – what you call being let go in the US. It was something to fill my time between looking for jobs. The original idea came from an ages old short story which happened to come to mind.

Is this book part of a series?

I would like it to be. Ideas for volume two are settling down. I guess it depends on how well volume one does.

Would you share a blurb with us?

When history goes off course, can it be nudged back? The second coming of Jesus Christ was supposed to take place in the thousandth year of His era, but it did not happen as scheduled.

Would you share a short excerpt?

Almost on the horizon, a waterspout was visible; a long writhing tail of dark air descending from a bulbous blue-black cloud.

“The Summer Hawk,” I heard someone say – that was the Viking ship which had sailed a little while before us. The men looking over the stern rail had a better view than those of us in the waist and I went back up the steep slope of the after deck which, at the stern, was quite high above the sea level.

Looking back, it was now possible to see great waves breaking about the lean shape of the Summer Hawk. As I watched, lightning scratched a jagged line from the cloud to the single mast, rigging and sparks flew skyward, snatched by that writhing funnel of air. The stern seemed to rise up and twist, the bows disappeared behind curtains of green and black water; the ship slid beneath the waves and was gone in a space of heartbeats. Gone, leaving only a wake to show she had ever been there.

Do you have plans for a new book? Would you tell us a little about it?

I mentioned that I would like to make this a series. A second volume might be placed in Northern Italy, early in the 12th century. The then Pope was a nasty piece of work and there was an attempt by the French to have him arrested and tried before a court of law which failed. I have a feeling that my characters might take a hand…

How long have you been writing? And who or what inspired you to write?

I guess I have to blame my Dad and my Uncle for inspiration. I’ve been writing since 2006 when I put Postponing Armageddon on paper but I wrote another fantasy between that and getting Postponing Armageddon published. Called Of Machines and Magics, it was actually written second and published first – both are published by Barking Rain Press.

Do you gift books to readers to do reviews?

I do. I’m very grateful for a thoughtful review; they’re worth a lot to me.

How do you come up with the Title and Cover Designs for your book/books? Who designed the Cover of your books?

With Postponing Armageddon it was a lot of discussion with Dad & my Uncle and since it reached the shortlist of the Sir Terry Pratchett/Transworld 2011 competition, that’s set in stone. Of Machines and Magics came out of equally long email discussion with Sheri Gormley, our President & Executive Director. The cover in both cases was created by Michael Leadingham who got the flavor so absolutely right.

Have you ever based characters on people you know or based events on things that have happened to you?

I’ve pinched names from people I know for my characters – with permission – but if I’ve based actual characters, it was unconsciously. Events, though, oh yes, especially where they have involved me.

Is there a certain Author who influenced you in writing?

Probably Mary Gentle, who wrote some great fantasy & science fiction, including an historic which certainly wasn’t the history we remember. My mentors too – Dad and my Uncle – introduced me to their favorite – Jack Vance. His Dying Earth series drew me into the setting for Of Machines…, a tale from the last days of Earth.

Which format of book do you prefer, eBook, hardback, or paperback?

It has to be hardback but, maybe paperback for bath-time and eBook when the readers get to be waterproof.

What is your favorite book and Why?  Have you read it more than once?

That’s a difficult one. I’ve read quite a few more than once but let’s say formative rather than favorite, which might put the Egyptian by Micah Waltari and his other books as very influential, though Waltari is not a well known author. And of course, Mary Gentle who wowed me with Rats and Gargoyles any number of times.

Do you think books transfer to movies well? Why or why not?

I don’t think there’s a definitive answer to that one. Apart from a few scenes, Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit both worked well, I thought. Shakespeare usually does. But there are many that just never do – as a character in a UK TV show used to say scornfully: “Straight to video” in a very Yorkshire accent. (Which I have too.)

What are you currently reading? Are you enjoying it? What format is it? (eBook, hardback or paperback)

 

The Outcast Blade, sequel to The Fallen Blade by Jon Courtenay Grimwood. Makes my toes curl, makes me weep, “gritty, grimy, decadent, compelling” says the Sunday Times. It’s a hefty paperback.

Is there a book you know you will never read? Or one you tried to read but just couldn’t finish?

I’ve been disappointed by Alastair Reynolds’ Terminal World and I’m not quite sure why. I didn’t finish it, either.

What do you think about book trailers?

So, so. My father had one made for one of his books; I don’t think it did anything for the title at all.

What piece of advice would you give to a new writer?

Be prepared for a lot of writing to hit the shredder or the delete box. But enjoy it, all the same. When you do get published, don’t worry about the occasional vicious review or posting. You got there, they didn’t.

Do you or would you ever use a pen name?

Have been known to! Adele Abbot didn’t just happen to be at the front of the alphabet!

If you could be any character in your book, who would it be and why?

Morion – she’s so damned cool.

      Morion – she’s so damned cool.

If your book was ever made into a movie, what actor/actress would you like to see play the main character(s)?

Gerard:          Damien Lewis

Matthias:       Hugh Laurie

Morion:          Anne Hathaway

Max:               Dwayne Johnson

      Have you ever considered writing in a completely different genre? If so, what would it be and why.

I haven’t thought about that. I’d like Adele Abbot to continue to be associated with fantasy – and somewhat out-of-the-ordinary themes.

Do you think the current popularity of eBooks will last or do you believe it is just another passing trend?

I think it’s more than a passing trend. The eBooks on phones is a phenomenon I wouldn’t have guessed at and I think that will see them well into the future.

Considering Traditional Publishing vs. Indie Publishing, do you think one has a clear advantage over the other? If so, please elaborate.

The Traditional Publisher lost the war, in my opinion. They were over-confident and self-opinionated and slow and suffocating. The Indies are great, they are nimble enough to take advantage of new technology, new ideas and new authors.

Would you ever consider writing as a part of a team, rather than on your own?

My Uncle and my Dad manage it very well but it needs two (or more) people who complement & respect each other. If such a one comes along, I’d try it out.

Have you ever had writer’s block? If so, what did you do about it?

I think anyone who works on their own must get writer’s block or it’s equivalent in other disciplines. But I’ve got a 4 year old son who is going to be the greatest fantasy writer ever – he’ll keep me fresh!

 

Where can readers follow you?

Your web site?                       Adele Abbot

Your Facebook page?        Adele Abbot on Facebook 

Your Twitter details?            Adele Abbot on Twitter

 

 

Buy Links for Postponing Armageddon: sign up for a preview & get 35% of the cover price…

Barking Rain Press: http://www.barkingrainpress.org/postponing-armageddon-preview/

 

 

Carol 1

 

Thank you for taking time out from your busy schedule to interview with us today. It has been a real pleasure having you here on our blog. I hope you will visit again in the future.

 

 

Review: POSTPONING ARMAGEDDON by UK Author, Adele Abbot

510x765-Armageddon 1

Postponing Armageddon

a fantasy by

Adelle Abbot

 

Gerard is a centurion leading a Roman legion. In his legion is Max, who resembles a Neanderthal, seems to be immortal and leads a small legion of his own, made up of other primitives. Gerard refers to Max as his uncle and also seems to be immortal. The two of them oversee the crucifixion of Christ.

A few years later, Gerard’s legion is sent to the frontier of Germania. He sleeps with a captive only to be disemboweled by her. Max comes to his bedside and eases his passing away.

Gerard finds himself growing up in Germania, aided by recollections of his earlier life. He is a great help to his politician father who takes him away on a diplomatic mission to the Schonau where he meets his mother from his past life and also meets a striking girl with green eyes called Morion, who is attending the diplomatic meeting for someone called Max. On the way home he steals away from his father and goes to Mandor to take up a life with his past mother. 

He attends the wedding celebration of his cousin in a family made immortal by being related to Max. He sleeps with a woman, not knowing that she is the bride to be, is caught by the cousin and saved from execution by Max who sends him into exile. He is taken away with a bag over his head by Morion and a troop of primitives. By the time they turn him lose far to the west, he and Morion are attracted to each other and plan to meet further west as soon she has taken care of business for Max with a Bishop of Hypolita.

As Gerard travels along enjoying his freedom, he comes upon a monk who has just been waylaid and his companion slain. The monk warily introduces himself as Brother Simeon and offers to pay him to be his bodyguard whilst he travels to Mont St. Michael with eleven sacred scrolls which he believes his assailants were after.

Gerard agrees, and as they begin traveling together, Morion begins appearing to Gerard in his dreams, repeatedly asking him where he is. Simeon discloses that he is the Abbot of Hypolita. At the first town they come to, they fend off an attack in their room by a pair of ape-like primitives whom Simeon thinks are after the scrolls.

At Mont St. Michael, Simeon adds an eleventh scroll and reveals that not only is there a twelfth, but that he is Matthias, a disciple of Christ who wrote one of the very scrolls. There, they fend off an attack in the night by a large group of ape-like primitives. Matthias announces that the thirteenth scroll waits in Britain and that when all of the scrolls are assembled they can be read together to begin the process of rebuilding the world.

On their way across the Channel, they are beset by a tempest with a waterspout. Gerard and Matthias are the only ones to escape when their ship is turned into an inferno by lightning. When they find their way to the abbey at Venta (Winchester) and inquire about the twelfth scroll, they find that it has been declared an unholy work of the Devil. They are seized and tortured before they escape to find themselves pursued by the primitives again. Soon Gerard is not only having more visions of Morion, but of Max as well, and he and Matthias are now having enough close encounters with the primitives that it is clear that Morion and Max are indeed in league with them, attempting to get hold of the scrolls.   

How all of this leads to the postponing of Armageddon would not be fair to disclose to potential readers, but as one can see, it is the beginning of a most unusual and intriguing story which develops and engages the reader very much like the very best fast reading murder mysteries. As far as I am aware, it is quite a new twist to slightly alter biblical and natural history in order to make a good fantasy. In the midst of its first rate entertaining of the reader, it raises thought provoking questions. One can plainly see at the end of the story why Armageddon is indeed postponed, but just exactly who are the demons here? Are they Morion and burly low browed Max and their wolf-men followers? Or are they abbots who order people nailed to timbers in blacksmiths’ sheds whilst scheming over plans of enlarged monasteries? 

Whatever the answer, Postponing Armageddon is outstanding entertainment, and as it is with the best films, I was compelled to read it twice immediately.

 Reviewed by: 

Carol Marrs Phipps