WHAM! Character Profile: Nia Greenwood

Nia Greenwood

Age 20

5’7’’

115 lbs

Green hair

Green eyes

Nia Greenwood is a half Fairy, half Human (here, Human is a race and therefore capitalized), daughter of Kellen and Cait Greenwood, sister of Tess. She is engaged to an Elf, Drake Evans, at the time she is taken by the evil Children and Family Services Police and shipped off to become a sex slave at the world Alliance’s underwater capital city of Atlantis. Nia is one of the two main protagonists in Wham!

Excerpt from Wham!

“So,” said the woman, leaning over her for a look. “Awake at last, I see.” She  straightened up at once. “I’m Mistress Bodine, but you may call me Sam. For Samantha of course.”

Nia threw her head from side to side in a panic. She could see guards. A device wired to her began beeping. “What is this place?” she said. “Why am I in restraints?”

“Why you’re at the capitol,” said Sam, switching off Nia’s monitor. “Don’t you remember being chosen for this honor?”

“The capitol!” cried Nia, struggling against the straps which held her. “Chosen! Is that what you call it when you abduct someone to be a toy for the monsters who’ve taken over the world?”

***

 

 

RRBC Spotlight Author, Flossie Benton Rogers

 

Writing Interview:

Describe the books you like to write.

The stories I am called to write are adventurous, quick moving, sensual, spicy, and flush with surprising twists and turns.  Many of the heroes and heroines are otherworldly–ghosts, guardians, goddesses, witches, fairies, angels, and demons, while some are human but with special insight. The otherworldly ones also possess humanlike attributes and personalities, while exploring the depths of their unique abilities and powers.  My characters must deal with challenges on the human earth world and other realities. Their lives don’t always unfold like a blossom opening to the sun. Sometimes a solar flare erupts and fries the pristine bud. Sometimes the flower morphs into a breathtaking, witchy siren. My characters seek beauty in the midst of darkness and devotion in the midst of bedlam. Simmering below it all is the immutable flame of eternal love.

What is the most important thing writers can do for themselves?

The most important thing a writer can do is write, write, and write some more. Instead of obsessing over getting your first book published if you are not going the indie route or finding an agent, write a second book, and a third.

What writers have influenced you?

Other than author Loretta C. Rogers, who convinced me that I could write a novel and get it published, I am drawn to the clarity, brevity, and action of vintage romance author Dorothy Cork and icon Rex Stout, author of the Nero Wolfe mysteries.

What literature do you find particularly compelling?

I love the novels of Hermann Hesse, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Franz Kafka, and Thomas Hardy; the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Shakespeare; and the poetry of Yeats and Keats, just to name a few.

Favorite quotes:

John Keats: “Real are the dreams of gods and soothly  pass their pleasures in a long immortal dream.”

Julian of Norwich: “All is well and all shall be well and all manner of things shall be well.”

How does your writing process work?

I like to plan, plot, and measure where the turning points should go and then allow the characters or chaos muse to take the story in unanticipated directions. As a writer, the initial planning provides a tether so that I’m not always floating in the stratosphere, while the openness to change gives color and liveliness to the project. New beings flutter forth from the fae dimension. I like a good surprise.

What message do you most want your writing to convey to readers?

Experience, enjoy, and esteem the magic of life.

 

Mind Your Goddess, Witchfae 3